Hi All...

The weekly email from our Operations Director to our students

Hi all,

4 more college days – though that is as much as a warning to Year 13 as anything else. Faye and Phil met a number of students and their parents last night to stress the importance of you taking responsibility for your revision and ensuring that you put yourself in the best position to achieve your target grade or better. A-Levels really matter – for universities / for apprenticeships / for further training. If you applied for a job as a teacher then you’ll be asked for your a-Level grades – not your GCSE grades. So make sure you’re doing everything you can (and more) to really achieve this summer.

Examinations – Help your child succeed evening
The new date for this is Wednesday 18th April – please make sure your parents are aware of this important night to ensure that you are supported in the exam period.

Exam Timetable
The exam timetable for May-June 2018 is on the BC6F website. Paper copies will be ready early next week too - look out for an email from Melissa.

Revision Resources
Our website has been updated and contains resources created and collated by us to help you with the key areas of revision in the weeks coming up to your exams:

1) Effective Revision Skills
2) Note-Taking Skills
3) Essay Writing Skills
4) Learning Quotes
5) Mindfulness

Please also remember that what really matters at this time of year is that you don’t rev in neutral: if you need help, guidance or advice about how to plan / how to revise / mindfulness – please let us know as soon as possible. We are happy to help individuals or even to deliver some group sessions to help support your achievement. Experts agree that the right preparation can improve your results by two grades. There are many ways to review work, and hard work, planning and starting early will maximise your chances of getting the best grades you can.

INSPIRE – R IS FOR RESPONSIBILITY
Accepting responsibility is a crucial part of ‘growing up’ - until you accept responsibility (direct or indirect) for your actions or failures, it’ll be very difficult for you to develop self-respect or even have the respect of others.

It’s a simple truth that all human beings (young and old alike) make mistakes and poor choices. The same goes for when we fail to act when we know we should. There are times when we all look the other way when we know the right thing to do is to take helpful action. So, you should first understand one thing – you’re not the first person (nor will you be the the last) who has fallen short in the personal behaviour department from time to time.

The second component of accepting responsibility is indirect responsibility. It involves moving beyond yourself and taking action to help people or situations around you that call for assistance. While this component – indirect responsibility – may not rise to the level of personal responsibility, it does reveal something about your character and the type of person you are. Clearly, there are many people who’ll walk right by the person who is down in the street, or down on his luck. However, there are others—thank goodness--who’ll quickly stop and try to help. It’s not hard to determine which of these two actions the most responsible choice is.

The real difference between being responsible and being irresponsible is an indication of how effectively we’re managing our lives when the opportunity to make a good or bad choice presents itself. Accepting responsibility – both personal and indirect responsibility – is one of the most important factors in defining a person’s true character. When that responsible moment comes, what you do – or don’t do – is an indication of the type of person you really are.

Failing to accept personal responsibility may work to your advantage on occasion or in the short term. For example, you might get away with keeping your mouth shut about something that you’ve done, or even blaming someone else for your misdeeds. You might not face consequences for your wrong actions...at the time. However – make no mistake about this – eventually this poor choice will catch up with you and, it’ll typically cause more pain for you down the road than if you’d stepped up to the situation, took responsibility for it and honestly said, “I did it”.

And finally …(I)
The shortest time anyone has owned a trouser press.

And finally….(II)
I wrote above about the importance of taking responsibility – especially when you are at fault. This is clearly the case with Ant (of Ant & Dec fame) who was caught drink-driving on Sunday and now faces a long spell away from our screens. To our generations, drink-driving is just a NO and can never be condoned. It was positive how many celebrities, whilst friends with Ant, were quick to wish him better but equally quick to say that his actions were completely wrong.

That said, I will miss ‘Takeaway’ (the show, not the meal) tomorrow night. There is something about their particular style – cheeky but not rude, youthful and energetic but nice with it – that works on many different levels and sees them appeal to all kinds of people of all ages. They are also funny – and they really do work to make the show what it is. A bit like revision – if you plan properly then you will be successful. Just watch how they set up James Corden last year – you’ll need 9 minutes but I promise you it is worth it.

Have a good weekend.

Cheers,

James

Hi all,

I hope you’ve all had a productive week. We are now less than 2-weeks from Easter so it is imperative that you’re ensuring all work is completed and submitted on time. If you have exams this summer then your revision should be well under way – leaving it late is only going to disadvantage one person which is you. As wise people say - Proper preparation prevents poor performance. If you need any help with structuring your revision or methods of effective revision then please see Faye / Phil / Melissa or me as soon as possible so that we can best support you.

Good Luck to…
Bramcote College’s Netball Team who are competing this weekend in the National Netball Finals in Welwyn Garden City. Good luck to the team – I hope that they all remember Bravery; Resilience; Attitude; Motivation; Commitment; Organisation; Talent; Energy. In a word – BRAMCOTE.
Examinations – Help your child succeed evening
The new date for this is Wednesday 18th April – please make sure your parents are aware of this important night to ensure that you are supported in the exam period.

Exam Timetable
The exam timetable for May-June 2018 will be published on the BC6F website early next week. We will let you know when your paper copies will be available, so look out for an email from Melissa.

MenB vaccine study participation
The University of Nottingham Health Service are inviting students in school year 12 to take part in a research project to understand whether immunising teenagers with vaccines against ‘Meningitis B’ could protect them and the rest of the community against these potentially deadly bacteria. This is a national study involving 24,000 year 12 students across the United Kingdom and BC6F have been invited to take part.

Meningitis is caused by an infection around the surface of the brain. It is rare but can be life-threatening and mostly affects babies, young children and adolescents. An important cause of meningitis is a type of bacteria (or germs) called meningococcus.
The study will look to see if immunising teenagers with MenB vaccines reduces the carriage of meningococcus in teenager’s throats, which could in turn protect the broader community.
You are being asked to be part of the study which will involve:-
• Participants receiving 2 doses of a Meningitis B vaccine. These are licensed vaccines that teenagers would not otherwise receive, and will reduce their risk of meningitis
• Participants would have two throat swabs taken 1 year apart
• There would be three study visits, over 12 to 18 months

We will be asking for your permission to take part and advising of the date of the study which will be after Easter. At this visit, students will formally consent to take part, complete a short anonymous questionnaire, have a throat swab taken and receive the first of the two doses of the MenB vaccine. If you are interested please let Melissa know asap.

MenB vaccine study participation
The University of Nottingham Health Service are inviting students in school year 12 to take part in a research project to understand whether immunising teenagers with vaccines against ‘Meningitis B’ could protect them and the rest of the community against these potentially deadly bacteria. This is a national study involving 24,000 year 12 students across the United Kingdom and BC6F have been invited to take part.

Meningitis is caused by an infection around the surface of the brain. It is rare but can be life-threatening and mostly affects babies, young children and adolescents. An important cause of meningitis is a type of bacteria (or germs) called meningococcus.
The study will look to see if immunising teenagers with MenB vaccines reduces the carriage of meningococcus in teenager’s throats, which could in turn protect the broader community.
You are being asked to be part of the study which will involve:-
• Participants receiving 2 doses of a Meningitis B vaccine. These are licensed vaccines that teenagers would not otherwise receive, and will reduce their risk of meningitis
• Participants would have two throat swabs taken 1 year apart
• There would be three study visits, over 12 to 18 months

We will be asking for your permission to take part and advising of the date of the study which will be after Easter. At this visit, students will formally consent to take part, complete a short anonymous questionnaire, have a throat swab taken and receive the first of the two doses of the MenB vaccine. If you are interested please let Melissa know asap.

Student Finance
New students should apply online at www.gov.uk/studentfinance. Those of you who have applied to university for September 2018 should have already been notified that Student Finance applications have now opened as of Monday 12th February. We advise logging on and setting yourself up an account ASAP. The Student Finance process is relatively lengthy, so the sooner you complete and submit it, the sooner you will have secured your student funding ahead of September. Click on the link above to begin. Please see Faye with any queries.

INSPIRE – PROFESSOR STEPHEN HAWKING
We often talk about the different components of INSPIRE. But, every so often, there is the opportunity to see all of the values of INSPIRE in one person and that is certainly the case this week with the sad passing of Professor Stephen Hawking.

Stephen Hawking was more than just a theoretical physicist with an Oscar-winning movie about him. He contributed not only to the world of science, but also to those looking to learn more about life. Throughout his career, Hawking has helped us better understand the planet, and at the same time, ourselves. For a man who was given just 2-years to live (aged 21) he deservedly became an inspiration over the last 55 years to anyone who had a disability.

• “I am just a child who has never grown up. I still keep asking these ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions. Occasionally, I find an answer.”
Hawking reminds us to stay as curious as we once were as children. He shows us how to be courageous. Not everything is impossible, and through the impossibility, we can discover answers just by asking questions.

• “If I had to choose a superhero to be, I would pick Superman. He’s everything that I’m not.”
Hawking, though brilliant and successful, still has dreams like everyone else. His longing to do things he might never be able to do shows how he’s just like the rest of us. We’re all human at the end of the day, and as humans, we can only do so much that our minds and bodies will let us. Hawking might not have the super strength or the ability to fly like Superman but he does have intelligence far greater than any comic book superhero. His life was a prime example in perseverance. Hawking endured his degenerative disease and even through it all, he accomplished so much – with so much humour, too.

• “It would not be much of a universe if it wasn't home to the people you love.”
So simple, so true. From a man who, I expect, will have INSPIRED future generations of scientists but who had humility and courage in everything that he did.

 

And finally….

Alongside the news about the death of Stephen Hawking this week there was also the sad passing of Jim Bowen, most famous for his 14-year stint of being host of Bullseye. If you have not seen it, it is worth looking up a couple of clips on YouTube – it was the only show where you could hear lines like “You’ve won a conservatory!’ ‘But I live in a tower block…”

Was there any other game show on British TV that was ridiculed for its prizes as much as Bullseye was? The highlight was always the final round of the show where the “non-darts player” got a chance to wield the darts as well (More genius exchanges such as: ‘Have you ever played darts?’ ‘Nope, never even held one in my life.’ ‘Excellent. The final round will depend on you being able to throw them accurately and consistently.’). They were then given the chance to gamble for ‘Bully’s Star Prize’. If they took up the challenge both players got three darts and between them had to total over 101 on a darts board. If they won the prize was revealed whilst the theme music played and the atmosphere in the studio became a touch livelier than it had been – not a difficult feat really. If they lost then Bowen would utter the immortal line ‘And here’s what you could have won!’ the prize was revealed whilst a sad version of the theme music played and the atmosphere in the studio became even more desperate. The most common prize for the winners was a speedboat (the show’s producer was best friends with a speedboat shop owner!) – however, this clip is comedy genius: Of all the pairings to win the clothing range… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aloNixbli6g

Have a good weekend.
Cheers,
James